The H. Moser & Cie zero gravity flight was packed with testing instruments and experiements

Groundbreaking Or Bunk? Talking Zero Gravity And Pioneer Collection With Edouard Meylan, CEO Of H. Moser & Cie

I was invited by H. Moser & Cie to attend a most atypical press conference in Zürich. The occasion was the first parabolic flight in Switzerland, during which Moser, along with its escapement-making sister company Precision Engineering, tested movements and components in zero gravity. H. Moser & Cie also launched the new Pioneer collection, its most contemporary yet.

IWC Ingenieur with black ceramic bezel

Understanding Ceramics: Now Used For Watch Cases, Bezels, And Much More

There has been a lot of talk and promises made by the watch industry about ceramics and their use in timepieces, so it would seem that a primer on the subject might make us much more informed consumers.

Romain Gauthier Logical One in red gold with black enamel dial

Why Do Ultra-High-End Watches Cost So Much? Hand-Finishing At Romain Gauthier Sheds Some Light

In this article I look at why high end watches cost so much by examining one of the most important factors. To answer this question, there are quite a few reasons, including low production numbers (mass manufacture brings prices down) and high complexity, but the one I will focus on here is hand-finishing, because unlike low production numbers and high complexity, ultra-high-level hand-finishing is not usually easy to appreciate.

The business end of an automatic lathe at the Nomos manufacture in which the component being turned spins while the cutting tool is stable

Focus On Technology: Multi-Axis Machining – A Primer

It occurred to me one day, while explaining to a visitor to my “office” how the machine “knows” where the part is, that many people have very little exposure to the machinery that literally builds so many wristwatch components today. So for your reading pleasure, I break down the basics of milling machines and turning centers, the multi-axis machines that have become a cornerstone of modern fabrication in the watch industry.

Nixie Machine for MB&F by Frank Buchwald, idea and Nixie tubes by Alberto Schileo

Science Fiction Incarnate: Frank Buchwald’s Nixie Machine For MB&F

When you think of fantasy and science fiction, what do you think of? I sometimes allow my imagination to drift into the paranormal and early twentieth-century years of discovery. This is the world that inspired the creation of Frank Buchwald’s latest creation for the M.A.D. Gallery, which is, of course, the Nixie Machine, a fantabulous clock featuring rare and giant Nixie tubes produced in the 1960s by the state-owned RFT in East Germany. I can imagine this clock in a variety of fictional settings from the worlds of Jules Verne, H.G. Wells, and even Isaac Asimov.

Is The Biggest Risk To National Security The Apple Watch And Fitness Bands?

Security breaches of company databases have been in the news recently, but what if there was a spy who knew everything you were doing, including when you slept, ate, had sex, exercised, and worked – at what and for how long. A spy that monitored not just what you were doing, but how you were doing it, for how long, and how well. Have you really thought about what your fitness bracelet knows?

Milling underway in a Valbray 5-axis CNC machine

350 Processors And 90,000 Watts of Power Just To Mill A Curved Line? CNC Primer

On a recent visit to the Valbray manufacture, I surreptitiously looked at the electrics in back of a CNC machine (as one does). Seeing my interest, Côme de Valbray, who co-founded the brand with his wife Olga, casually mentioned that the racks of electronics contained the processing power of 350 powerful computers and that the machine drew up to 90,000 watts of power in operation: that’s equivalent to the power used by around ten homes.

Artemis Racing in action

Ulysse Nardin’s First Sponsorship: Artemis Racing, Iain Percy, And The America’s Cup

Ulysse Nardin founded his company on the precision required for marine chronometers. So supporting a challenger for the 35th America’s Cup as its official partner more than makes sense, and supporting Artemis Racing makes the most sense of all.

Alan Turing statue wearing a Bremont Codebreaker at Bletchley Park

“Alan Turing” Wearing A Bremont Victory At Bletchley Park

Cumberbatch portrays Alan Turing in the film “The Imitation Game”. Turing was instrumental to the Allied effort during World War II by leading a group of English mathematicians working at Bletchley Park to crack the German Enigma codes. Have a look at the Turing statue wearing a Bremont Victory for a brief second. What a fitting tribute!

The intricately engraved case of the Pomander Watch

Is This The World’s Oldest Known Watch? A Peter Henlein Mystery From 1505

It’s a story that could have come out of a thriller novel, and it’s about the oldest known watch in the world, which was made in 1505 by Peter Henlein. The Pomander Watch (‘Bisamapfeluhr’), as it is known, was confirmed by committee of experts as having been the work of Peter Henlein in 1505.