A. Lange & Söhne Lange 1 black-dial and stainless steel case

Behind The Lens: Rare Lange 1 Limited Editions

In this edition of ‘Behind the Lens,’ GaryG pays tribute to the introduction of the A. Lange & Söhne Lange 1 twenty years ago on October 24, 1994. He brings us stunning images of two very special variants of the classic watch: the rare Cellini limited edition, of which only 25 were made for the New York City retailer, and the even rarer stainless steel Lange 1, which was not a limited edition per se but certainly a (very) limited sort-of production watch.

A close up look at the dial of the Patek Philippe Advanced Research Reference 5550P Perpetual Calendar

Behind The Lens: Patek Philippe Advanced Research Reference 5550P Perpetual Calendar

Welcome to the second installment of “Behind the Lens.” This time, our subject is the Patek Philippe Advanced Research Ref. 5550P, a truly lovely perpetual calendar with some interesting technical twists.

Jean Daniel Nicolas Two-Minute Tourbillon by Mr. Daniel Roth in pink gold (photo courtesy Guy Lucas de Peslouan)

The Watch That Changed My Life: The Jean Daniel Nicolas Two-Minute Tourbillon By Daniel Roth

Many watches hold a special significance for their owners. The watch I am chronicling here didn’t just change someone’s life, it changed MY life: the Jean Daniel Nicolas Two-Minute Tourbillon by Daniel Roth.

Greubel Forsey Double Tourbillon Technique

Objects Of Desire: Greubel Forsey

In the “Objects of Desire” series, I’ll be looking at pieces that fall into the latter two categories – a mix of unobtanium and timenotrightium, as my Quill & Pad colleague Joshua Munchow might say. And, where better to start on the topic of desire than with the watches of Robert Greubel and Stephen Forsey?

Central triple-axis tourbillon of the Vianney Halter Deep Space Tourbillon

Why I Bought It: Vianney Halter Deep Space Tourbillon

This is the first in a planned series of “why I bought it” articles that will unfold here over time. Of course, there will be photos – and lots of them – but I hope you’ll find my commentary on a collector’s mindset and the motivations, delights, and possible misgivings behind each individual transaction interesting, too. Let’s start the series off with a bang: the Vianney Halter Deep Space Tourbillon.

A happy momement. Your author collecting his Simplicity from its creator, Philippe Dufour.

Why Philippe Dufour Matters. And It’s Not A Secret

“I have no secrets as past watchmakers had. There are graveyards full of secrets and that’s enough.” –Philippe Dufour, 2014

Have you heard of Philippe Dufour?

Chances are, if you have been collecting watches for any significant period of time, his name is well known to you. If not, let me enlighten you.

F.P. Journe Tourbillon Souverain with remontoir d’égalité

Behind The Lens: The F.P. Journe Tourbillon Souverain

As part of my “enthusiast collector” role here at Quill & Pad I will be taking a look at watches that strike my fancy, and sharing the visual results with you along with a few observations on photography, the watches themselves, and the collectors who own them.
Let’s get started, shall we? Our subject for this episode: the F.P. Journe Tourbillon Souverain with remontoir d’égalité.

Blue Merit by Grieb & Benzinger

An Enthusiast Collector’s View Of The Grieb & Benzinger Blue Merit

De gustibus non disputandum est, as they say: there is no arguing about taste! In particular, I’m not one to tell people what they can do with their belongings. If you, for instance, want to take your Ferrari, paint it pink, and put a giant Hello Kitty decal on it, that’s your privilege. That doesn’t mean that I have to like the item in question. In this instance, I am referring to the Grieb & Benzinger re-interpretation of the classic A. Lange & Söhne Pour le Mérite Tourbillon christened Blue Merit.

A. Lange & Söhne Double Split after refurbishment

Why You Can’t Afford To Buy Your Watch If You Can’t Afford To Break It

My first rule when it comes to collecting is to avoid setting too many exclusionary rules.

I am sure that there are many theme-centered watch collectors who put emphasis on things such as owning one of each Omega vintage chronograph from a certain year or Elgin railroad watches of a particular decade. These people might consider what I do far too haphazard to be labeled “collecting,” for instance.

If, however, I force myself to set criteria for what constitutes collecting to me, I keep coming back to two rules for myself: passion and enjoyment.

And this is perhaps best defined by asking yourself, “Are you emotionally engaged with the items you collect, be they watches, cars, or bottle caps, and do you take advantage of all of the enjoyable aspects of owning them?”

With watches, I believe, the former criterion – passion – is what separates collectors from investors and accumulators. Which brings me to the second criterion: deriving the full enjoyment from the things you own.

Watchmaker assembles the Vostok-Europe Lunokhod 2, the first to use a Soprod movement, in Vilnius, Lithuania. Photo courtesy Tim Temple Imagery

A Short History Of The Russian Watch Industry And Where It Is Today

When it comes to manufacturing in Russia and Eastern Europe, the typical items that most often spring to mind tend to be nesting dolls, Fabergé eggs, amber jewelry and many of the world’s best-built fighter jets and machine guns.