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Why I Bought It: Bell & Ross BR 03-92 Black Matte Ceramic

The first time Bhanu Chopra strapped a borrowed BR 03-92 Black Matte Ceramic on his wrist, he thought that it was the perfect Bell & Ross watch for him, checking all the boxes for the characteristics he expected from an aviation-style instrument watch. He bought one and it has been part of his core pilot’s watch collection ever since. This is why.

A Crash Course In Flieger (Pilot) And B-Uhren (Navigator) Watches Covering Both Historic And Modern Examples (A Pilot’s Watch Photofest!)

The majority of today’s numerous flieger-style watches are inspired by the now-iconic German pilot’s and navigator’s watches of World War II, becoming a genre unto themselves. Bhanu Chopra flies high to take a deep dive into the long history of this popular style.

How Dials Are Made At The Glashütte Original Dial Factory In Pforzheim, Germany

Glashütte Original dial factory manager Michael Baumann guided Bhanu Chropa through the complex process of manufacturing dials. He explained that depending on the complications of a given watch model, it takes 70 to 80 steps to manufacture a perfect dial. See for yourself in this interesting personal tour behind the scenes in Pforzheim, Germany.

You Are There: Visiting Tutima Glashütte In Germany

Tutima has one leg in the realm of fine watchmaking and the other firmly placed in its lower to mid-priced Grand Flieger collection, composed of German pilot-style watches. Bhanu Chopra visited the Tutima manufacture in Glashütte, Germany for a closer look at how this duality works and what role it plays in the company’s history.

You Are There: Visiting The L.A. Mayer Museum For Islamic Art In Jerusalem, Home Of The Breguet No. 160 ‘Marie Antoinette’

When Bhanu Chropra visited Israel on a business trip in 2019, a colleague suggested a short visit to see the historically important sites in Jerusalem, and knowing his passion for horology said that he had a special surprise for him: visiting the L.A. Mayer Museum for Islamic Art. The museum holds one of the world’s most horologically significant pocket watch, clock, and automaton collections, and the star of the show is Breguet No. 160, aka “the Marie Antoinette.”