‘The Watch Annual’ 2021 Book Review: For Watch Lovers By Watch Lovers

The inaugural edition of ‘The Watch Annual’ came out just before Christmas 2020, and now Elizabeth Doerr is pleased to hold the second edition – ‘The Watch Annual’ 2021 – in her hands. This book is about the watch community, a reflection of social media, the watch fam, and, of course, new watch releases. But it’s also about something else too: charity, appreciation, and giving back.

Book Review: ‘Inside Burgundy’ Second Edition By Jasper Morris

Some wine books are absolute must-haves for any serious, wine-obsessed drinker/collector. Jasper Morris’ ‘Inside Burgundy,’ released just over a decade ago, is right at up the top of that list. Put simply, it was as thorough and thoroughly competent an examination of a region and its wines as exists anywhere. And Morris has just released an updated second edition, which Ken Gargett reviews here.

Book Review: ‘Konstantin Chaykin: Haute Horlogerie, With Russian Soul’ – If You Love Independent Watchmaking, You Will Love This Book

Elizabeth Doerr was particularly pleased to receive a copy of ‘Konstantin Chaykin: Haute Horlogerie With Russian Soul’ and to discover it was expertly written by Alexey Kutkovoy, both of whom she has known and respected for many years. Her verdict? “There is nothing left to say but ‘spectacular’.”

Book Review: ‘The Worlds Of Jaquet Droz’

To celebrate the 300th anniversary of the birth of its founder, Jaquet Droz commissioned a big, beautiful book written by Swiss historian Dr. Sandrine Girardier. Elizabeth Doerr reviews ‘The Worlds of Jaquet Droz’ here.

Book Review: ‘The Watch Annual’ 2020, For Watch Lovers By Watch Lovers

‘The Watch Annual’ 2020 by Justin Hast and James Allen is a 172-page book featuring 72 watches from a large variety of price points and categories submitted by 40 contributors from 19 different countries. It is a book for watch lovers by watch lovers, coming from the so-called #watchfam. And it gives back. What’s not to like?

Book Review: ‘Stalin’s Wine Cellar’ By John Baker

Whether ‘Stalin’s Wine Cellar’ is a journey about chasing fakes, or if these bottles hidden away in the former Soviet Union are genuine, the story makes for a rollicking saga. And if the bottles are genuine, who really did own them and what on earth might they be worth? The tale takes us on twist after twist and has been described as “Raiders of the Lost Ark for wine lovers.” Ken Gargett couldn’t put the book down.

Thinking Of Gifting A Book To A Watch Lover This Holiday Season? Here’s A Selection Of Horological Tomes To Consider

Any time is an appropriate time to gift a watch lover with a book containing well-written words and beautiful photos of watches. At Quill & Pad we love reading books as much as we love writing them (on occasion). Here Elizabeth Doerr shares a selection of inspiring books we have reviewed, suitable for gifting or reading at any time of year. But especially this time of year!

‘The Millenium Watch Book’: Quill & Pad Readers Can Pre-Order Your Copy For 60% Off

‘The Millennium Watch Book’ is a coffee-table publication looking back over the watch industry’s triumphs between 2000 and 2020. It’s likely to be interesting for both watch enthusiasts and newbies; everyone is certain to enjoy looking back on these ticking memories of the last 20 years of watchmaking.

Book Review: ‘Retro Watches’ By Josh Sims And Mitch Greenblatt

Very, very rarely does Elizabeth Doerr see a watch book where everything fits together in the way a book should: engaging, well-written text; very obviously carefully copyedited; great paper quality; good, clear, pleasing-to-the-eye design; super photography, and an engaging subject matter. And she’s happy to report it does here. ‘Retro Watches’ by Josh Sims and Mitch Greenblatt is a must-read for those interested in affordable, design-focused watches of a quirky bygone era.

Book Review: ‘Patek Philippe In America: Marketing The World’s Foremost Watch’ By John Reardon

This richly illustrated coffee table book weighing close to two kilograms is both an invaluable reference tool and a fascinating read. The chapters do not scrimp in detailed information, expert opinion, and rich historical illustrations: even the book’s structure points are a pure joy to read or simply thumb through. Elizabeth would recommend it heartily for anyone with even a passing interest in the subject and here’s why.