How LIP And Timex Became Involved In Two Of The 20th Century’s Most Vicious Industrial Disputes

If you were to ask people about the first watch they received as a child, the majority would probably say it was a Timex. And although LIP was at one point the world’s seventh largest watch manufacturer, it’s now little known outside France. Both companies share an extremely turbulent past one aspect of which Colin Smith shares with us here.

Zenith El Primero circa 1969 on the wrist

Exceptional Movements In History: Zenith El Primero – Reprise

Loved the world over by collectors and watch brands alike, the Zenith El Primero has been keeping the world on time since 1969. And Rolex choosing to use the movement was high praise for Zenith indeed. The El Primero is still considered an exceptional chronograph to this day, and watchmaker Aston Tracy explains why.

50 Years Of Automatic Chronographs And The Recent Debuts From Zenith, TAG Heuer, And Seiko Commemorating The Milestone Invention(s)

1969 marked the introduction of the world’s first self-winding chronographs. These were presented by Zenith with its El Primero, Seiko with the 5 Speedtimer, and an illustrious group consisting of Breitling, Heuer/Leonidas, and Hamilton/Büren, with the Chronomatic Caliber 11. Sabine Zwettler takes us through the history and looks at three of the latest-generation commemorative automatic chronographs by these early pioneers.

Omega Seamaster Aqua_Terra 150M James Bond

Element Of Surprise: Omega Constellation And Seamaster Were Designed By René Bannwart, Founder Of Corum – Reprise

When writing ‘Bridging Art and Mechanics: The Unabridged Story of the Corum Golden Bridge,’ Elizabeth Doerr discovered much more about Corum’s artistic co-founder, René Bannwart, including the fact that he was the creator of Omega’s flagship Constellation and Seamaster lines.

Patek Philippe Beta 21 and advertisment (photo courtesy Atom Moore and Christie's)

Quartz: Past, Present, But No Future? – Reprise

Nothing can stir up the watch world these days quite as much the launch of a new Apple watch. For some it’s a must-have gadget, for others it just isn’t a real watch. But perhaps quartz watches face more competition from smartwatches than mechanical watches. Does quartz even have a real future?

Room 21 of Balcony House in Mesa Verde National Park, Colorado: the long wooden beam was used as a sort of gnomon for astronomically ascertaining the solstice and equinox

How The Native American Ancestral Puebloans Kept Track Of Time – Reprise

If you’ve been lucky enough to travel to the “four corners” area of the southwestern United States (where U.S. states Utah, Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico “meet”), then you may have seen or even visited some of the cliff dwellings built by ancient natives. Read on to find out what we know about how this ancient tribe of people kept time and why.

El Castillo at Chichen Itza

The World’s Biggest Man-Made Calendar: El Castillo At Chichén Itzá – Reprise

Contemplating the 30-meter-high ancient pyramid at Mayan archaeological site Chichén Itzá in the blazing Yucatán sunlight, Elizabeth Doerr was awestruck by the structure’s complexity. Not just because of the pure historical ramifications of the pyramid and temple known as El Castillo, but also because of its timekeeping capabilities. Yes, you read that right: timekeeping capabilities!

Breguet Grande Complication No. 1160

The Intriguing Story Of Marie Antoinette And Her Legendary Breguet Pocket Watch No. 160 – Reprise

In 1783, just as the queen of France, Marie Antoinette, was sitting for a portrait, an officer of the queen’s guard visited Abraham-Louis Breguet’s workshop: Queen Marie Antoinette desired a pocket watch containing all known horological complications at the time. It took 44 years to complete and is perhaps the most famous watch in history, as much for its intriguing story as its ingenious mechanics.

IWC Da Vinci Tourbillon Retrograde Chronograph

A Horological Guide To London

London is one of the world’s metropolises that can very easily stand its ground against the others by doing what it does best: being profoundly British. There are plenty of sensational timepieces in London if you know where to look, and in this article Martin Green shares a few of his favorite places.

Breguet No.611 for Jerome Bonaparte

Battles Of Breguet Part Two: Waterloo

Even when you are really good at your craft and universally recognized, you might unwittingly find yourself in the middle of a battle. This is what happened to Abraham-Louis Breguet in the early nineteenth century as the Napoleonic Wars were being waged throughout Europe. For many years these conflicts offered both opportunities and challenges to Breguet. Martin Green explains why.