Yusupov Fabergé Egg

Parmigiani Fleurier And The Yusupov Fabergé Egg Of 1907 – Reprise

When they hear the name Fabergé, most people immediately think of Imperial Easter eggs. The egg tradition hatched in 1885 when Tsar Alexander III commissioned his first Easter egg from Fabergé as a gift to his wife, Empress Maria Feodor. This became a yearly tradition, with Fabergé creating 49 eggs in total for the Russian court up to 1916. Here we have the story of the Yusupov Egg of 1907 and how it was restored by Parmigiani.

Mythbusting: 3 Persistent Patek Philippe And Rolex Myths Debunked – Reprise

The rise of the internet, and the consequent evolution of the watch-watching community, has inevitably amplified the phenomenon whereby certain objects have come to exert an extraordinary hold over the collective imagination. Here, Colin Alexander Smith debunks three watch myths circulating widely and freely online and in print concerning former French president Nicolas Sarkozy’s Rolex and Patek Philippe, the Khanjar Rolex Sea-Dwellers, and what in fact Sir Edmund Hillary and Sherpa Tenzing Norgay were wearing on their wrists as they summited Mount Everest.

In Memoriam: People Who Left Us In 2021

Every year people working in the watch industry pass away, and brands come and go. Here Elizabeth Doerr highlights a special few of the people we lost in 2021.

History Of Ferrari Watches: Hublot, A High-Speed Partnership

Ferrari had already teamed up with quite a few different watch brands to feature the Prancing Horse logo on the wrist: Cartier, Girard-Perregaux, and Panerai are forces to be reckoned with, yet it was Hublot who enjoyed the greatest success in partnering with the famed car brand from Maranello. And Martin Green thinks that this might be the most successful car/watch partnership that the industry has seen so far. What do you think?

Why December 7 Plays A Vital Role In A. Lange & Söhne’s History

The saying “history repeats itself” is often associated with unfavorable occurrences. But this is definitely not the case with A. Lange & Söhne and December 7, a date that has marked milestones for the brand three times now. Sabine Zwettler explores the significance of the founding day of Glashütte’s finest manufactory.

New A. Lange & Söhne Zeitwerk Lumen Honeygold, Plus Why October 24/25 Is So Significant To Lange

A. Lange & Söhne launches the Zeitwerk Lumen in a limited edition Honeygold case on October 24, 2021. The brand’s own special gold alloy adds fresh appeal to one of its technically most complex pieces. But there is much more to this launch rooted in history as Sabine Zwettler notes.

ETA/Valjoux 7750 front and back

Valjoux 7750: The World’s Greatest Chronograph Movement By Far (By Popularity And Numbers) – Reprise

As Martin Green became ever more impressed by the performance of the Valjoux 7750 chronograph movement, he also found himself enamored by its little quirks and the variety of watches it has been tapped to power. Here Martin outlines the history of this classic automatic chronograph movement.

Gérald Genta: Legendary Watch Designer With A Renegade Spirit – Reprise

Gérald Genta’s claim to eternal horological fame is closely connected to the rise of high-end stainless steel watches: he designed both the Audemars Piguet Royal Oak (1972) and the Patek Philippe Nautilus (1976). While those two watches alone are enough to make Genta a legend, he did much, much more than that as Martin Green shares here.

175 Years Of Watchmaking In Glashütte: A History Of Fine German Watchmaking – Reprise

Watch- and clockmaking has a long history in Germany, as evidenced by the fifteenth- and sixteenth-century timepieces from the Nuremberg/Augsburg area and the academic discussions of Peter Henlein, who is said to have made the world’s first pocket watch around 1505. But the country’s roots in great watchmaking do not stop there: Elizabeth Doerr takes us on an historical journey of Glashütte, the birthplace of modern Germany’s fine watches.

How The Wall Came Tumbling Down: Watches Made In Germany – Reprise

I clearly remember watching the history-altering events on television on November 9, 1989: the day that the Berlin Wall came tumbling down. Since then, watchmaking in Germany, just like the country as a whole, has undergone a lot of change, including the rebirth of Glashütte’s horological industry.