Ulysse Nardin Marine Tourbillon

The Enticing Qualities Of “Entry-Level” Tourbillons – Reprise

If there is one complicated element that has been in a whirlwind (pun intended) of developments, it has been the tourbillon. And while tourbillons are still fairly expensive, you don’t have to spend $100,000 anymore, as many brands now have great offerings for even a third of that amount.

: Supporting the brand: group wristshot at the Jaeger-LeCoultre Costa Mesa OCNA event

Jaeger-LeCoultre: A Collector’s ‘Gateway Drug’ And Ongoing Pleasure – Reprise

While his friends’ paths into serious collecting have been fairly diverse, GaryG started with Jaeger-LeCoultre, which opened his eyes to the world of fine watchmaking and served as the foundation for his ongoing fascination with horology. Take a look at Gary’s history collecting fascinating timepieces by this Swiss brand.

Singer Reimagined Track 1 on the wrist

Here’s Why: The Chronograph Is The New Tourbillon – Reprise

Based on the most popular releases of 2017, it is possible that the almighty tourbillon may about to be usurped by something new and rather old at the same time: the chronograph. In this installment of Joshua Munchow’s “Here’s Why” series, he explores why the chronograph is the new tourbillon.

Object of desire: Contemporaine Phase de Lune/Jour by Vianney Halter (photo courtesy Horlogerie-Suisse.com)

How Not to Buy a Watch: My Misadventure – Reprise

In 2006 GaryG spotted two objects of desire at a California dealer: Vianney Halter’s dramatic Antiqua and Contemporaine timepieces. They were out of his reach, but in 2007 he found a Contemporaine in white gold offered at a price that was about one-third its original retail value on eBay. What could possibly go wrong?

Two prototype Caliber 906 watches from Jaeger-LeCoultre

Why I Bought It: Two ‘Unsalable’ Jaeger-LeCoultre Caliber 906 Prototypes – Reprise

This is the story of the final watch – or, truthfully, pair of watches – that GaryG happened upon at a Sotheby’s auction in late 2017 and felt that he just had to have: two 1970s prototype pieces made by Jaeger-LeCoultre. But why “unsalable”? Find out here!

You know you’re a watch guy if . . . at a restaurant you photograph everyone's watches but not the food

You Know You’re A Watch Guy Or Gal If . . . – Reprise

Horophiles are pretty unique people and have some pretty unique traits and habits. In the theme of Jeff Foxworthy and his “you might be a redneck if” routine, John Keil pokes a little fun at our WIS brothers and sisters as well as ourselves. So without further ado, you know you’re a watch guy if . . .

Blackened Rolex Explorer II

Why I Pimped My Rolex – Reprise

The watch nerd that WMMT is, he rarely immediately wears his new watches, putting them aside for a few days and letting the anticipation grow. When it finally came time to wear his new Rolex, he took it out of the box and proudly put it on his wrist. And then horror struck: he didn’t feel anything, not a thing! Zilch, nada, niente! What to do?

Dial Restoration: Aesthetics Or Functionality? And How To Decide

Most will agree that re-painting a dial is a big no-no. Vintage pieces with re-painted dials can be had for a steal as they are difficult to shift and mostly unwanted. But not all dial restorations are created equal, and we do encounter varying degrees of “upgrades.” Some of these upgrades are purposeful deception, while others are not. Here is what one watchmaker feels about the subject.

The Jaeger-LeCoultre Tribute to Reverso 1931

Why I Bought It: Jaeger-LeCoultre Tribute To Reverso 1931 – Reprise

Over the twenty-odd years that GaryG has been buying “serious” watches, he has purchased more pieces bearing the Jaeger-LeCoultre brand name than any other, by far. Within the Jaeger-LeCoultre pantheon, one watch sub-group stands out for him: the Reverso. Between his wife and he, they’ve bought a total of seven Reverso models. Given that, why add another? In this instance, the Reverso Tribute to 1931?

Urwerk UR-CC1 in white gold

The Retrograde: One Of My Favorite Complications – Reprise

The retrograde indication is one of Joshua Munchow’s favorite “Because We Can” (BWC) complications. Gears are an amazing invention and have allowed watchmakers to make incredible creations. Simple gear systems leave a multitude of openings for creativity. He looks at some great examples of them here.