“crossbar/cutthroat razor” click on the Philippe Dufour Simplicity

The Schmidt List: Top 5 Funky Clicks – Reprise

The click spring is one of the smaller components of a mechanical watch, but it is of enormous importance. Ever wondered why the crown doesn’t retaliate furiously and unwind every time you crank it? Without the click spring, a wound mainspring would immediately – and explosively – uncoil like a raging viper in a hat box.

Armin Strom Masterpiece 1: Dual Time Resonance

Understanding Resonance, Featuring The F.P. Journe Chronomètre à Résonance, Armin Strom Mirrored Force Resonance, And Haldimann H2 Flying Resonance – Reprise

Resonance. No, it is not a Tesla-themed Evanescence cover band. Resonance is a physics principle that, to be honest, most people will never need to know to go about their daily lives. So what is all the hubbub about resonance? It’s a word that is, even in the watch world, so mysterious and rare that it is heard only once or twice a decade. In this article Joshua Munchow explains how resonance works and why it matters.

Fitting Rolex balance wheel and Parachrom hairspring

Hairsprings: Origins, Progress, And (Dare I Say) Exciting Future – Reprise

The tiny, delicate, nearly impossible-to-create hairspring is the one of the biggest advances for modern scientific technology there is. Here Joshua Munchow takes a dive into the muscle of the beating heart of most mechanical watches: the hairspring.

Fast vs. Slow, Hertz vs. VPH: Your Watch’s Frequency Explained – Reprise

You may be familiar with numbers such as 18,000 vph, 28,800 vph, and even 36,000 vph describing the frequency of a watch’s regulator, but few really know what those numbers mean. Watchmaker Ashton Tracy explains why watch frequencies matter, but he oscillates in choosing a winner. Follow the discussion here.

Functions and indications of the George Daniels Space Travellers' watch

Equation Of Time (EoT): What Is It And What’s The Attraction? – Reprise

In its simplest form, the equation of time is defined as the difference between the time displayed by the position of the sun (as by a sundial) and the mean time displayed by any modern clock or watch. But that’s just the beginning. Watchmaker Ashton Tracy explains more.

The Jump Hour: A Love Story – Reprise

The jump hour has a long history, but first things first: it can’t technically be called a complication since the accepted definition of complication is a mechanism that provides information other than the time. However, anyone who gives a hoot will say in the same breath that there are many complications that don’t fit that definition and Joshua Munchow couldn’t agree more. But why does he love the jump hour so much?

Warning: Strong magnetic field ISO symbol

The Truth About Magnetism And Watches – Reprise

General everyday contact with magnets isn’t going to cause your beloved wristwatch any real harm, but overdoses of magnetism may still present a problem, causing erratic timing and even stoppage altogether as watchmaker Ashton Tracy explains. What to do when this happens?

ETA Valgranges movements

It’s A Date! Taking A Closer Look At The Most Popular Complication Of Them All: The Calendar – Reprise

Date windows on wristwatches can be a touchy subject. Many feel they are downright ugly and destroy the look of a good watch, while others swear by them as the most useful and affordable complication. Whatever camp you may be in, the date function can be the cause of considerable grief, particularly the rapid-set mechanism.

My Top 5 Favorite Watches With Helical Hairsprings – Reprise

Out of all the “traditional” styles of hairsprings, the helical hairspring is Joshua Munchow’s favorite because it adds three-dimensionality to the watch. These oscillators are so rarely seen that if you are only aware of five watches with helical hairsprings you already know a significant portion of the modern watches using them. Here are Joshua’s favorite five.

Celebrating 175 Years Of Watchmaking In Glashütte: 12 Extraordinary, Inventive Movement Finishing Techniques, Decoration Styles, And Technology

Over the course of 175 years in Glashütte, Germany, some of the noblest elements of fine watchmaking were invented, including the flying tourbillon, the duplex swan-neck fine adjustment, and the three-quarter plate, setting these Germanic masterpieces apart from the venerable art of Swiss watchmaking. Here Sabine Zwettler explains 12 magnificent decorative and technical elements of the Glashütte art of fine watchmaking.