Rolex Twinlock winding crown

Here’s Why The Crown is the Unsung Hero of Watchmaking (and Why Rolex Wears The Crown) – Reprise

This is one of the most important yet underappreciated parts of a watch: the crown. The humble crown has played an extensive role in helping Rolex – and the rest of the watch industry – get to where it is today. Here’s why.

Professional Diver Nigel Band and the Unusual Rolex Sea-Dweller and Oyster Perpetual Models that Plumbed the Depths and Scaled the Heights – Reprise

Nigel Band is a professional diver with over 30 years’ worth of commercial and teaching experience. He also owns two rather unusual Rolex watches: a 1986 “triple-six” Rolex Sea-Dweller Reference 16660 and a Himalayan mountain climbing 1952 Rolex Oyster Perpetual. Put on your breathing apparatus as the fascinating stories of these two watches are told by Colin Alexander Smith here.

So, You Want to Buy a Rolex? Well, Daddy-O, I’m here to Talk you Out of It!

If you’re in the market for a new watch, Tamim Almousa’s advice is, if there’s a Rolex that you like, go for it. But if you just want a Rolex, you’re probably better off with an Omega. Here he explains why.

Rolex Cosmograph Daytona vs. Zenith Chronomaster Sport: Head-to-Head – Reprise

Day one for the Zenith Chronomaster Sport was January 21, 2021. And it seemed like everyone had the same reaction: “That is one aggressive Rolex tribute.” Tim Mosso thinks that the Chronomaster Sport is a distinctive product with its own identity and takes a look here at how it stacks up against the ever-popular Rolex Cosmograph Daytona.

Thoughts on Rolex Acquiring Bucherer: Is Rolex Changing the Industry Again?

When the news broke that Rolex was acquiring Bucherer, a move that caught everyone by surprise. Until now, Rolex did not have its own authorized dealers, except for one in Switzerland. However, Rolex decided that the opportunity to acquire Bucherer was too good to miss. Raman Kalra shares his thoughts on what this acquisition might lead to.

The components making up the bi-directional winding system of the Rolex Caliber 3135

Which Rolex Movement Takes the Top Spot? A Watchmaker’s Comparison of Rolex Calibers 3135 and 3235, plus Which is Better? – Reprise

Ask any watchmaker about the Rolex 31 family of calibers and the story will be the same: it has stood the test of time. Ashton Tracy hasn’t met a single watchmaker who doesn’t love working on these workhorse Rolex movements. They are easy to service, keep great time, and stand up to abuse. Put simply: they work. So how does it stand up to big brother, Find out right here!

Omega vs. Rolex: How Omega is Reaching for the Crown

It is the old age question – Rolex vs. Omega. Which brand should I buy from? Which brand produces better watches? Should I buy an Omega Seamaster Professional 300M or Rolex Submariner? Through their histories, the two brands have been going head-to-head whether it’s on design or technology. Raman Kalra explores how Omega compares to Rolex.

Fitting Rolex balance wheel and Parachrom hairspring

Is Silicon Here to Stay in (Rolex) Watch Movements? – Reprise

Hairsprings are miniscule. Generally no more than one centimeter in overall diameter when coiled, they are roughly 50 microns thick and 150 microns wide. Tiny they may be, but insignificant they are not. In fact, they are so significant that Rolex refers to them as “the guardians of time.” But what do silicon hairsprings bring to the table? Watchmaker Ashton Tracy explains why he went from skeptic to fan.

Rolex Skydweller in steel

The Golden Age of Rolex Movements Part III: Branding vs. Breakthroughs in Recent Years – Reprise

The last two decades have witnessed regular Rolex engineering advances, often in plain sight and in rapid succession. Despite these developments, Rolex remains a brand defined not by movements but by continuity, model families, and the Rolex image itself. Tim Mosso thinks that the root of Rolex’s soft-pedaled reputation for movement virtuosity lies in the company’s own branding strategy. That and more in this third installment of Rolex’s history of movement technology.

2012 Rolex Sky-Dweller in solid gold

The Golden Age of Rolex Movements Part II: Rolex gets Complicated with Innovations and Patent Registrations – Reprise

From the public’s perspective, Rolex’s surge into its movement revolution began with the now anachronistic-sounding Basel 2000 World Watch, Clock, and Jewelry Show. But the evidence of a long-term engineering campaign was mounting at the patent office and in the dealers’ showrooms as this article by Tim Mosso highlights.